Turn signal switch replacement

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gnat
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Turn signal switch replacement

Post by gnat » Thu Aug 23, 2018 1:37 pm

I thought there was a good single DIY for this out there that I used when I did this the last time, but couldn't find it this time. I worked from a couple of Pelican guides (steering wheel removal and adding the OBC), but they uncharacteristically didn't list all of the required tools. So here is my DIY on it.

This is actually a really easy DIY, though getting the airbag off and on can be annoying since you are doing it blind.

Typically airbag removal instructions direct you to disconnect the battery and give the system time to drain. I personally don't bother, but your comfort/risk tolerance may be different. So you don't have to disconnect the battery, but it is the safer route. The only difference is that if you do not disconnect it, you'll want to pull the fuse the for horn (B3 - 25amp) as it will get triggered (especially during re-installation).

Note: If your horn is beeping randomly on you, this is a good time to change the airbag carrier while you have the wheel apart.

You'll need the following tools:
T27 torx with at least a 2" reach - airbag retaining bolts
24mm socket with extension arm - steering wheel nut
Marker - to mark the steering column and wheel for reinstallation
Medium/normal sized phillips screw driver to remove the clock spring and front column cover
Small phillips screw driver - column cover
Small/Medium flat head or prying device - stalk end caps
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The first step is to locate the holes on the back of your steering wheel for the airbag retaining bolts. These pictures were taken against the most awesome 4 spoke wheel so it may be different for the boring 3 spoke travesty.
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As the holes on the 4 spoke wheel line up between the spokes, I find it easiest to turn the wheel 90 degrees to the left or right to make accessing the holes easier (again, this may differ with the 3 spoke):
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Insert the torx into the holes and loosen the bolts (I suggest bottom, then top) and make sure you have a hand holding the airbag when you remove the second as it could fallout. As you are operating blind, engaging the driver into the head of the bolt can be tricky, so be patient with it.

When the airbag is free you can lift it away and find it attached to a cable with a yellow plug. Simply pull the plug out from the back of the airbag and set the airbag aside:
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There are two brown wires coming off the clock spring. One is attached to the carrier plate and the other is attached to the steering wheel frame (this is the horn wiring). Pull both plugs off (labeling isn't needed as the short one can only reach it's correct place).

The next step is to remove the nut from the steering column with a 24mm socket. I recommend using your marker to mark the position while the nut is still on as that lets you cheat on torquing it back on (e.g. simply line up the marks). The mark line should go from the bolt onto the steering wheel so you can align them correctly during re-installation. Once the nut is removed and placement marked, pull the wheel free. You'll likely need to guide the wires from the clock spring out through the cutout. Do not pull those wires too hard as you could damage the spring.

Once the wheel is removed you should see this:
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Using the medium phillips remove the 4 outer screws holding the column cover plate on and remove the plate. Leave the 2 screws on the clockspring alone for now:
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Now we want to remove the upper and lower column covers. There is a rubber grommet on each side surrounding the stalks:
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And a small phillips screw on each side:
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Once the grommets and screws are removed, the top panel will lift away with a bit of wiggling:
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The bottom panel has two clips towards it's rear. Squeeze the clips (one side at a time) with your fingers while pushing up and they come free and panel will then slide out with some wiggling:
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Now use the medium phillips driver to remove the 2 screws holding the clock spring on and slide it off the column. I did not disconnect it and just let it sit on the column:
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Here is a shot of the back of the new module as you'll be a bit blind while you work. The items to note here are:

The "pipe" clamp with the 8mm bolt which is used to clamp it to the steering column.
The plastic pegs amidst the brass ones are used as guides to line up with the plugs you will connect.
The wires coming off the bottom that will be a bit annoying to route.
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Now locate the 8mm bolt on the old unit and loosen it until the module moves freely. Then disconnect the large plugs on the back and remove the module from the column:
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On the left side of the column you'll have the annoying wires still connected. Unplug the wires on the side facing the rear of the car and move them out of the way (they have different plugs so you can't mess up the reinstall):
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Now pop the wires attached to the old module out of the bracket which will free the module to be set aside.

Now we simply reverse the process to put it all back together with the new module. Here are some tips though:

For the wires that you just removed, I find installing the outer one first and having it's wires run through the "trough" first. Then do the inner one and run those wires through. As the inner cabling is a bit thicker they hold everything in the "trough" better.

When you put the front cover back on, the screws won't go in far and it feels like something is wrong. Nothing is wrong, you simply have to thread the new sheet metal. So you will need to apply a bit of force to get them started and then they should get much easier.
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Getting the airbag reattached was the biggest PITA of the whole process. Not sure I can offer tips as I think finally getting the bolts to engage was just dumb luck. I will say, however, that turning the bolts the correct direction does help the situation though...

The final step is to pop the cap of the right stalk(s) and move them to the new stalk(s). You just need something small to pry under the end towards the control module and pop it out. Then it snaps in place on the new stalks.

And here are some of the broken bits that fell out:
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Attachments
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32wildbilly
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Re: Turn signal switch replacement

Post by 32wildbilly » Thu Aug 23, 2018 2:57 pm

gnat wrote:
Thu Aug 23, 2018 1:37 pm
I thought there was a good single DIY for this out there that I used when I did this the last time, but couldn't find it this time. I worked from a couple of Pelican guides (steering wheel removal and adding the OBC), but they uncharacteristically didn't list all of the required tools. So here is my DIY on it.
Nicely done!! Remind me if my car needs this done to take it to an Indi or just resort to using the approved arm signals. There are so many things I could F-up and destroy the whole steering mechanism rendering the car into a yard ornament or a pretty boat anchor.

BTW: Them some pasty white hairy ass legs with ugly feet attached to them...but nicely done. Unusual that someone would do maintenance and repair on a car in the nude, but each to his/her own. Just leave the gratuitous nudity out next time! :?

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gnat
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Re: Turn signal switch replacement

Post by gnat » Thu Aug 23, 2018 3:20 pm

32wildbilly wrote:
Thu Aug 23, 2018 2:57 pm
Nicely done!! Remind me if my car needs this done to take it to an Indi or just resort to using the approved arm signals. There are so many things I could F-up and destroy the whole steering mechanism rendering the car into a yard ornament or a pretty boat anchor.
Thanks.

The first time I messed with an airbag I was paranoid and followed every recommendation I found for safety (disconnect battery, let it sit, press the brake pedal so the lights bleed off electricity, etc..), but when I bothered to learn about how the system works I got far less concerned.

Clock springs are also substantially easier to work with than they used to be. Gone are the days of pulling the wheel off and having the thing pop out on you. Now they are assembled units that you have to do something special to ruin. Pretty much just not pulling hard on the wires is the only rule you need to remember anymore.

It's also worth nothing that I'm a lazy bastard that was willing to pay the ~$200 labor for my Indy to do it, but I couldn't stomach the additional $200 markup on the part. So that I did this is really a mark of how easy it is. Based on the timestamps of the pics, it took me less than an hour.

If the airbag scares you, just unplug the battery and give it 30 minutes. Otherwise they put this all together in a manner that they only thing you can screw up is getting the steering wheel back on in the correct position. The marker trick is the most common way to avoid problems, but a level can help too. Even if you get it off center, it's not hard to fix.
Unusual that someone would do maintenance and repair on a car in the nude, but each to his/her own. Just leave the gratuitous nudity out next time! :?
I'm married so I gotta get my jollies somehow! Don't judge! :lol:

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5chn3ll
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Re: Turn signal switch replacement

Post by 5chn3ll » Fri Aug 24, 2018 12:41 pm

Sweet. Nice write-up. Pee Pee Eye even approves...
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32wildbilly
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Re: Turn signal switch replacement

Post by 32wildbilly » Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:25 pm

5chn3ll wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 12:41 pm
Sweet. Nice write-up. Pee Pee Eye even approves...

2gg8ct.jpg
I cannot believe you are turning that lovely dog into a MEME actor!

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Re: Turn signal switch replacement

Post by 5chn3ll » Tue Aug 28, 2018 1:18 pm

I've seen him happily eat a fresh cat turd, and when the cat starts to hock up a hairball, Pee Pee Eye goes in search of a fresh, hot lunch.

Wearing safety goggles is not a low for him. Choking on a petrified forest turd and having to sweep turdmafrost from his airway...now that was a low point.
"996Outpost - you come for the Porsche chat but you stay for the artfully framed spooge pics."

-DrStrangelove

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32wildbilly
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Re: Turn signal switch replacement

Post by 32wildbilly » Tue Aug 28, 2018 1:23 pm

5chn3ll wrote:
Tue Aug 28, 2018 1:18 pm
I've seen him happily eat a fresh cat turd, and when the cat starts to hock up a hairball, Pee Pee Eye goes in search of a fresh, hot lunch.

Wearing safety goggles is not a low for him. Choking on a petrified forest turd and having to sweep turdmafrost from his airway...now that was a low point.
You don't let him lick your face...right?

Has he ever learned to lay down before he rolls over?(history test)

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Re: Turn signal switch replacement

Post by 5chn3ll » Tue Aug 28, 2018 1:31 pm

While the dog has free run of the house, with almost no furniture limitations, there are a couple of immutable rules:

1) Don't Shit In the House.
2) Don't Pee In the House.
3) Stop Trying To Penetrate The Cat's Anus. She is not into you.
4) "Kisses" are only allowed on the nose. You want to lick the tip of my nose, super. Knock yourself out. You lick my tongue, dog, and it's time to pack your shit.
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